August 8, 2017

VTT develops healthy cosmetics from berry seeds

It takes one kilogram of berries to yield 10 grams of seed husk fractions, but a small amount is enough for use in cosmetic products.
It takes one kilogram of berries to yield 10 grams of seed husk fractions, but a small amount is enough for use in cosmetic products.
VTT

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a method of recovering active substances from seed husks. The husks from berry seeds have qualities that prevent the growth of harmful microbes and can be applied to cosmetics, VTT finds.

Berries contain a range of healthy compounds for the skin, such as polyphenols: micronutrients known for their antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

VTT has optimised the extraction of these compounds for a variety of berry seeds and found the final product suitable for the cosmetic industry.

“Cosmetics trends include the maintenance of healthy skin and replacement of preservatives with natural compounds,” says Riitta Puupponen-Pimiä, principal scientist at VTT, in a release. “Berry seed husks contain large amounts of antimicrobial compounds, which can help to maintain a natural microbial balance in the skin by suppressing the growth of harmful microbes while beneficial ones flourish.”

The extraction method depends on the size of the berry seeds and VTT has both patented and pending patents on different methods. Some berries also contain higher levels of anti-microbial compounds than others.

In Finland, the most effective berries are cloudberries and Arctic rasperries, with high levels of polyphenols. But VTT’s research has shown that other health-promoting compounds are also found in berry seeds that could be used in food and cosmetics in a number of ways.

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