July 11, 2016

Finnish researchers break world record in microwave detection

More sensitive microwave detectors could lead to significant improvements in communication systems and measurement techniques.
More sensitive microwave detectors could lead to significant improvements in communication systems and measurement techniques.
Ella Maru Studio

Researchers at Aalto University have set a new record in the energy resolution of thermal photodetection.

Docent Mikko Möttönen, leader of CQD Labs.

Docent Mikko Möttönen.

Aalto University

A new partially superconducting microwave detector broke the former world record by fourteen-fold.

Smaller than a single human blood cell, the detector could lead to the development of ultrasensitive cameras and accessories for the quantum computer.

“For us size matters,” says Mikko Möttönen, the leader of the record-breaking Quantum Computing and Devices research group. “The smaller the better. With smaller detectors, we get more signal and cheaper price in mass production.”

Giving development of the detector’s commercial applications a considerable boost, the European Research Council (ERC) has just awarded Möttönen the prestigious Proof of Concept Grant. This is his third ERC grant.

Share: