March 29, 2016

Finnish potato crisps in demand around the world

In addition to the Nordic countries and central and southern Europe, Finnish potato crisps are exported to Russia, China and South Korea.
In addition to the Nordic countries and central and southern Europe, Finnish potato crisps are exported to Russia, China and South Korea.
Nina Huisman

The Finnish company Real Snacks is taking Finnish-made potato crisps around the world, all the way to China and South Korea. Switzerland is next in line to receive exports.

Already one-fifth of Real Snacks’ sales result from exports. In addition to the Nordic countries and central and southern Europe, Finnish potato crisps are exported to Russia, China and South Korea. The company is Finland’s only potato crisp manufacturer.

“The demand for the Finnish product is increasing both domestically and internationally, and we are looking for added growth in our home market and in terms of exports,” says Mikko Tahkola, member of Real Snacks’ board of directors. “We have made major investments in our plant, which will enable the large-scale expansion of our activities in the future.”

The company is focusing in particular on product development and high-quality Finnish raw materials. The offering includes organic corn snacks for children, which are free of gluten, milk and salt, without added sugar.

Furthermore the company’s contract farmers are located within a 100-kilometre radius of the plant, which means that the origins of the potatoes is always known. Knowing the origins of the raw material is also important in terms of exports, because, for example, Chinese consumers consider the traceability of products to be important.

“Finland has clean raw materials which is valued both here and globally. Information on which producer the potatoes have come from is included on each package, something that we have received positive feedback on from consumers who increasingly value locally produced food and information on the origins of the product,” say Tahkola and the company’s CEO Arja Kastarinen.

Share: