October 28, 2015

Finland’s social justice ranked highly by EU index

Thanks to its policy of free education for all citizens, every child in Finland is guaranteed solid stepping stones from which to leap into the future.
Thanks to its policy of free education for all citizens, every child in Finland is guaranteed solid stepping stones from which to leap into the future.
Eeva Anundi / Tekes

An annual survey of social conditions in the European Union has ranked Finland in the top three out of the 28 member countries, just behind Sweden and Denmark.

German think tank Bertelmann’s Social Justice Index utilised a sextet of indicators to assess each country. Finland was ranked favourably for its poverty prevention, equitable education, labour market access, health, social cohesion and non-discrimination. The country’s inter-generational justice in particular was well perceived, taking second place in the EU.

Overall the index found there to be a sizeable gap between the countries in northern Europe and those in southern parts of the continent.

Young people in their early 20s across the EU were identified as being increasingly marginalised due to the current economic situation. Almost one-third of those aged between 20–24 in Italy are currently not in education, employment or training. Meanwhile, youth unemployment in Spain and Greece is still well over 50 per cent. Altogether, some 24.6 per cent of EU citizens are currently regarded as being at-risk-of poverty or social exclusion.

At the tail end of the list, Greece, Romania and Bulgaria were least favourably ranked overall in this year’s index.

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