Good News from Thu, 29 March, 2012:

Making waves with water supply solutions

SATEL draws on 25 years of experience in wireless telecommunications for applications requiring a trouble-free and uninterrupted transfer of data under all circumstances. The water sector is one of the application areas for radio modems. SATEL draws on 25 years of experience in wireless telecommunications for applications requiring a trouble-free and uninterrupted transfer of data under all circumstances. The water sector is one of the application areas for radio modems.

Diminishing water resources increase the demand for efficient wastewater treatment, water recycling, renewable energy and efficient water distribution. Watrec and SATEL are coming up with solutions and bringing them to the markets.

Watrec designs and implements cost-efficient and tailored biological treatment processes for industrial wastewater.

— We focus especially on biological, anaerobic processes through which wastewater can be used to produce biogas, in other words renewable energy which can further be used to generate electricity and heat, explains Director Kimmo Tuppurainen.

— The biological process is usually combined with a chemical or physical treatment process which enhances the end result. When industrial wastewater is treated at the source, the load on the sewerage system is lessened and wastewater duties decrease. Additionally, using the biogas for energy production reduces energy costs, Tuppurainen adds.

According to Tuppurainen, wastewater can be made clean enough to be reused for watering plants or as process water. Watrec aims to grow and develop globally in the wastewater and renewable energy sector. And there is a lot of interest in the markets.

— The markets are growing steadily, especially in the Middle and Far East. Competition has also increased in recent years which challenges us to develop the efficiency of our products even further, says Tuppurainen.

Reliable distribution of water

— The importance of water supply has increased and continues to do so. In many parts of the world water distribution is still on a rudimentary level, even in urban areas, illustrates Samuli Koro, Vice President of SATEL Oy.

SATEL, a company specialised in wireless data communication, has created solutions for remote control and monitoring of water facilities and their distribution networks. In practice this means wireless data transfer using a radio modem.

— A radio modem network can be set up to meet the requirements of, say, a water facility, in which case the facility owns the data transfer network itself and is independent of, for example, mobile phone networks. This means that transferring data within its own network is free for the water facility, Koro explains.

By using wireless remote control, the operations of water distribution networks can be optimised, enabling secure water distribution. It also saves water. According to Koro, one of the most significant advantages of the radio modem network is its reliability even in exceptional conditions, in which commercial networks often lack in capacity or if a storm causes electricity outages.

— In 2010 a storm caused outages in Eastern and Central Finland bringing to a halt, at its worst, more than a thousand mobile phone network base stations. At the same time local water facilities were using around a thousand SATEL radio modems. No problems relating to the storm were reported, says Koro.

— The difference in reliability between a system using radio modems and one using a mobile phone network results from, among other things, the mobile phone network’s high electricity consumption compared with the radio modem. In a typical water facility, a radio modem can manage on, for example, a regular car battery for up to two months without any external electrical supply, concludes Koro.

www.watrec.fi

www.satel.com

SO

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